The Personal Adventures and Experiences of a Magistrate During the Rise, Progress and Suppression of the Indian Mutiny Mark Thornhill

ISBN: 9781230387192

Published: September 12th 2013

Paperback

116 pages


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The Personal Adventures and Experiences of a Magistrate During the Rise, Progress and Suppression of the Indian Mutiny  by  Mark Thornhill

The Personal Adventures and Experiences of a Magistrate During the Rise, Progress and Suppression of the Indian Mutiny by Mark Thornhill
September 12th 2013 | Paperback | PDF, EPUB, FB2, DjVu, AUDIO, mp3, ZIP | 116 pages | ISBN: 9781230387192 | 5.30 Mb

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1884 edition. Excerpt: ... CHAPTER XXXV.MoreThis historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher.

Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1884 edition. Excerpt: ... CHAPTER XXXV. CONCLUSION. After leaving Muttra I had no further direct concern with the mutinies. I will, however, briefly relate the leading events that accompanied their suppression. Early in the year Lucknow was relieved, and the Gwalior contingent dispersed. The lower part of the Doab being now cleared of the rebels, Lord Canning left Calcutta and assumed charge of the Upper Provinces. He fixed his residence at Allahabad, to which station he transferred the seat of government.

In the course of the year Lucknow was captured and Eohilcund reoccupied. So far as these provinces were concerned the mutiny was ended. It was not, however, till the lapse of another year that order was restored in Central India and other places. In November 1858, a general amnesty was proclaimed, and the Queen assumed the sovereignty of India. Her doing so gave great satisfaction to the natives, but for a reason which the English public would not have imagined, and of which I do not believe it is even now aware. The natives were under the belief that the East India Company farmed the country from the English Crown.

They supposed, consequently, that the abolition of the Company would be followed by a remission of revenue to the extent of the profits which the Company had been in the habit of receiving. They also imagined that the direct government by the Queen would be accompanied by the establishment of a court, and a display of that splendour so congenial to their tastes.

In the suppression of the mutinies, or rather in what followed their suppression, there were displayed many of the best English characteristics, but also some of our qualities less praiseworthy. There was no retaliation, no revenge- but, on the other hand, there was that rigid adherence to...



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